Glossary

This short glossary is thus organized:

  • the usual writing in the west;
    • the traditional chinese characters for the term, and the simplified chinese characters for the same term;
    • the Pinyin writing for the term;
    • the Wade-Giles writing for the term;
    • the translation and a short explanation.
  • chansijin
    • or
    • Pinyin: chánsījìn
    • W-G: ch’an2 ssu1 chin4
    • Silk reeling. Qigong exercise in Chen family taijiquan (tai chi chuan) training.
  • dantian
    • Pinyin: dāntián
    • W-G: tan1 t’ien2
    • Cinnabar field, or elixir field. Location in the body where the qi or vital breath gathers.
  • fajin
    • or
    • Pinyin: fājìn
    • W-G: fa1 chin4
    • To issue power. Refers to the explosive moves in Chen style taijiquan (tai chi chuan).
  • fangsong
    • or
    • Pinyin: fàngsōng
    • W-G: fang3 sung1
    • Release and relax. In taijiquan (tai chi chuan) it has the meaning of internally opening a joint.
  • huiyin
    • or
    • Pinyin: huìyīn
    • W-G: hui4 yin1
    • Meeting of the yin. Acupuncture point in the lowest area of the trunk.
  • jin
    • or
    • Pinyin: jìn
    • W-G: chin4
    • Strength. The radicals in the character also convey the idea of flow. Contrast with .
  • laojia
    • or
    • Pinyin: lǎojià
    • W-G: lao3 chia4
    • Old form: the best known set of forms in Chen style taijiquan (tai chi chuan), made up by two forms. Usually refers only to the first of these two forms.
  • neigong, nei kung
    • or
    • Pinyin: nèigōng
    • W-G: nei4 kung1
    • Internal exercise. Refers to a kind of exercise which was probably influenced by Daoist gymnastics, and has a goal of transforming the body.
  • neijia
    • or
    • Pinyin: nèijiā
    • W-G: nei4 chia1
    • Martial art style that appeared and disappeared in the XVII century in China. From the start of the XX century, mainly due to a marketing move by Sun Lutang, the term began to be used to refer to a group of chinese martial styles which employ neigong and qigong (chi kung) exercises, and have some common broad principles.
  • pengjin
    • or
    • Pinyin: péngjìn
    • W-G: p’eng2 chin4
    • The flexible, resilient and powerful structure acquired by the body through taijiquan (tai chi chuan) practice.
  • qigong, chi kung
  • quan, chuan
    • Pinyin: quán
    • W-G: ch’uan2
    • Fist. Also used to refer to an empty-hand fighting system, or to one form (set of movements) in such a system.
  • taiji, taichi
    • ou
    • Pinyin: tàijí
    • W-G: t’ai4 chi2
    • The yin-yang duality which springs spontaneously from wuji, the union of yin and yang, supreme axis.
  • taijiquan, tai chi chuan
    • or
    • Pinyin: tàijíquán
    • W-G: t’ai4 chi2 ch’uan2
    • Ultimate Boxing: chinese martial art created by Chen Wangting in the XVII century.
  • tuishou
    • Pinyin: tuīshǒu
    • W-G: t’ui1 shou3
    • Pushing hands. Partner exercise in taijiquan (tai chi chuan).
  • yang
    • or
    • Pinyin: yáng
    • W-G: yang2
    • Male principle, or the characteristics of movement, heat and light.
  • yin
    • or
    • Pinyin: yīn
    • W-G: yin1
    • Female principle, or the characteristics of inertia, cold and darkness.
  • zhanzhuang
    • or
    • Pinyin: zhànzhuāng
    • W-G: chan4 chuang1
    • Standing post, a neigong practice in taijiquan (tai chi chuan).